ALBERT CAMUS

"My field," said Goethe, "is time." That is indeed the absurd speech. What, in fact, is the absurd man? He who, without negating it, does nothing for the eternal. Not that nostalgia is foreign to him. But he prefers his courage and his reasoning. The first teaches him to live without appeal and to get along with what he has; the second informs him of his limits. Assured of his temporally limited freedom, of his revolt devoid of future, and of his mortal consciousness, he lives out his adventure within the span of this lifetime. That is his field, that is his action, which he shields from any judgment but his own. A greater life cannot mean for him another life.

The Myth of Sisyphus